Home » Indiana » Lyles Station

James W. Loewen (1942-2021)

We mourn the loss of our friend and colleague and remain committed to the work he began.

Lyles Station

Indiana

Basic Information

Type of Place
CDP, Unincorporated Borough, or MCD
Metro Area
Politics c. 1860?
Don’t Know
Unions, Organized Labor?
Don’t Know

Sundown Town Status

Confirmed Sundown Town?
Black Town or Township
Was there an ordinance?
Don't Know
Sign?
Don’t Know
Year of Greatest Interest
Still Sundown?
Surely Not

Census Information

The available census data from 1860 to the present
Total White Black Asian Native Hispanic Other BHshld
1860
1870
1880
1890
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
2020

Method of Exclusion

  • Unknown

Main Ethnic Group(s)

  • Unknown

Group(s) Excluded

  • Unknown

Comments

A former Indiana resident writes,
%u201CI was born in 1938 in Allendale and spent my childhood through high school in Mt. Carmel. When I was a grade schooler I remember being told by someone in the community about an old law that blacks had to leave town by sundown. Supposedly there had been a knife fight (I think set in the 20’s) between a black man and a white man, and “for the sake of all concerned” blacks “used to” have to be out of town when it got dark. As a child I took that to mean that it was for the protection of both races.%u201D
The black population in the area lived mainly in an Indiana town called Lyle’s Station halfway between Mt. Carmel and Princeton, IN. The women in those families came to Mt. Carmel to work as domestics in oilmen’s homes, and the men went to Princeton to the Potter and Brumfield factory. None of us ever visited Lyle’s Station.%u201D

According to LylesStation.org: “Today, only a few homes remain in the community of Lyles Station but nearly half of the residents are descendants of the original black settlers. Along with the scattered houses, the African Methodist Episcopal Church, a grain elevator, and the schoolhouse are all that stand as a physical reminder of the once-thriving settlement of Lyles Station, Indiana. However, the spirit of freedom and perseverance which made the town prosper is still very much alive in the hearts and minds of those individuals who are worked diligently to restore the Lyles Consolidated School building.”