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James W. Loewen (1942-2021)

We mourn the loss of our friend and colleague and remain committed to the work he began.

Evergreen Park

Illinois

Basic Information

Type of Place
Suburb
Metro Area
S. Chicago
Politics c. 1860?
Unions, Organized Labor?

Sundown Town Status

Confirmed Sundown Town?
Was there an ordinance?
Sign?
Year of Greatest Interest
Still Sundown?

Census Information

The available census data from 1860 to the present
Total White Black Asian Native Hispanic Other BHshld
1860
1870
1880
1890
1900 445
1910
1920
1930 1594 1589 3 2
1940
1950 10531 1
1960 24178 24154 5 19
1970 25487 25444 5
1980
1990 20874 20499 74 225 6 70
2000 20821 18388 1644
2010
2020

Method of Exclusion

  • Police or Other Official Action
  • Realtors

Main Ethnic Group(s)

  • Unknown

Group(s) Excluded

Comments

Someone who grew up there during the 50s and 60s remembers her Italian father was proud of the way African Americans were kept out of that village. One time a black family moved into a house and somehow “it caught fire.” By the time the volunteers got there it had burned to the ground. That village is only about two miles square, so I have to suspect that the volunteers were taking their sweet time in order to allow the house to burn.

A 1997 interview revealled that the entire police force is allegedlly all white. Some residents call the Evergreen Mall ‘Everblack Mall.’

A longtime resident of a nearby neighborhood said, “In my childhood it was sort of a standing joke/observation that any car pulled over outside the mall parking lot be the EP police had a black driver.

A resident in 2012 said, “Most of the people who get pulled over in Evergreen park are black drivers. It has always been a joke to us to slow down whenever you get to 87th & Kedzie, sit up right, two hands on the wheel to ensure that you won’t get a ticket for anything. This type of fear instilled in one major group leads me to believe that some of these practices are still in effect de facto.”

An interview in 2012 with a resident suggested that the town at one point had an ordinance banning “For Sale” signs on property. The law now requires such signs.