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James W. Loewen (1942-2021)

We mourn the loss of our friend and colleague and remain committed to the work he began.

Comanche

Texas

Basic Information

Type of Place
Independent City or Town
Metro Area
Politics c. 1860?
Unions, Organized Labor?

Sundown Town Status

Confirmed Sundown Town?
Surely
Was there an ordinance?
Don't Know
Sign?
Don’t Know
Year of Greatest Interest
Still Sundown?
Don’t Know

Census Information

The available census data from 1860 to the present
Total White Black Asian Native Hispanic Other BHshld
1860
1870
1880
1890
1900
1910
1920
1930 2435 0
1940
1950 3840 1
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
2020

Method of Exclusion

  • Unknown

Main Ethnic Group(s)

  • Unknown

Group(s) Excluded

  • Black

Comments

In 1940, a citizen’s organization proudly announced
that Comanche was “the home of the purest Anglo-
Saxon population of any county in the United States.”

“I wanted to be a cheerleader because they’re the
popular people. Me and my brother are the only two
black people in school. My brother hangs out with the
Mexican kids. I do things by myself a lot. I feel like I
have to try harder to fit in. That’s why I keep my hair
braided and long, to look like the other girls. . . The
other girls, they go out to get their hair done %u2014 but I
can’t go, because the hairstylists here can’t do my
hair. I wish there were more black kids. I’d have
someone to relate to in history class, when they’re
talking about the slaves or Martin Luther King. If I
were at a school with black kids, I could go to their
house, they could come to mine. With a bunch of kids’
parents here, the white girls can’t date Hispanics or
blacks. It bothers me. Some people aren’t like that. I
went to the prom with a white boy whose parents
didn’t mind. But sometimes kids in our school will be
having a party, and if I find out and say why wasn’t I
invited, you could tell that they really want to invite
me but they can’t.” “But my mom takes me places,
and we go do stuff. My mom tells me it’s just life, you
just have to deal with it.”
-Talila Harlmon, interviewed in “Alone in the Crowd”,
NY Times Magazine, 16 July 2000